Most Robinhood day traders lose money

 

Trader on tehe phone

Isn’t that weird that the large execution platforms insist on easiness and low costs of , rather than showing stats of profitable traders?

That’s because “maybe 0.5% of day-traders earned more than the initial salary of a bank teller”.

Personal experience: I have not seen one true money-maker among all the hundreds of candles-and-patterns prop-traders who have reached out to me for investments. Actually, those words would be enough for me to throw them immediately out of the pile of cash-seekers.

 

Credit to Bob Pisani at CNBC.

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Written by Gontran de Quillacq

Gontran de Quillacq is an expert witness and a legal consultant. He is a recognized authority in options, trading, derivatives, structured products, portfolio management, hedge funds, mathematical finance, quantitative investment, strategy research and financial markets in general.

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  1. A History of Daytrading: Regulators, Congress and Robinhood | Navesink International - […] Most Robinhood day traders lose money […]
  2. The high price of free trade | Navesink International - […] so the statistics are alarmingly clear: almost all day traders lose money. Sometimes a lot. Sometimes, they kill themselves…
  3. The revenge of the retail trader | Navesink International - […] Also day trading is hard, and many stock traders still don’t make much money. […]
  4. Robinhood's $65m SEC penalty and the 'gamification' of trading | Navesink International - […] They end-up facing professional investors, who are much better informed and equipped than them. A previous note showed that…
  5. A History Of Daytrading, NASD, NASDAQ, DOJ, SEC, Congress, And Robinhood | Navesink International - […] Most Robinhood day traders lose money […]
  6. Robinhood's $65m SEC penalty and the 'gamification' of trading | Navesink International - […] on margin. They face professional investors, who are much better informed and equipped than them. A previous note showed…

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